How to Use a Router as a Repeater

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How to use a router as a repeater
Copy over the settings Ignore any setup wizards, and go to the Wi-Fi settings page. Finally, you will get an option to reboot. This function will be taken over by the main router, or by the ISP that provides the Internet connection to your location. If you have a large house or simply a Wi-Fi blackspot, you can use a second router to cure the problem. After the password is entered, the router will display its initial status page, with links to the various administration settings. Connect your computer to the router using a standard Ethernet cable.

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How to Extend Wi-Fi Network Using an Old Router as a Repeater

Head to the LAN setup page or simialr and give the router an IP address in the same range as the IP addresses given out by my main router, but outside of the range that is automatically assigned by DHCP. Dynamic Host Communications Protocol is the process by which a device issues IP addresses to equipment on the network.

You need to stop the slave router giving out IP addresses to devices, leaving that task in the hands of the primary router. Disable DHCP by un-ticking it on the relevant configuration page. To assign a fixed IP address, let's assume the main router has an address of Give the slave router an IP address of Remember this address as you might need it to access this router later.

Remember, too, that once you've change the router's IP address you will have to wait for it to reboot, and then access it by typing the new IP address into your browser's address bar. Now we are ready to connect it all together. The ideal way to connect two routers together is with a long network cable. However, this is usually impractical so the best alternative is to use cheap powerline networking adapters.

These work by using the mains power cables in your walls and floors to act as network cables as well as passing electricity through them. They work only on ring mains which are all connected back to a single consumer unit fuse box. If you have two separate buildings or an extension which has its own electricity supply and meter, then powerline adapters aren't going to work. Take a smartphone, tablet or laptop, and check to see the signal strength when close to each of the routers.

You will find that you have successfully extended the reach of your wireless network and now have a second wireless access point. Without needing network cables, or powerline adaptors, that is.

In a nutshell, the key steps are finding the bridge or repeater mode in the configuration tool, choose it, and then enter whatever network information the tool asks for. To use them takes some technical knowledge and the ability to follow instructions very closely. For example, installing DD-WRT on a router in most cases is almost as simple as installing a program onto your computer.

However, doing it incorrectly can leave you with a router that you have to throw away. So follow the instructions carefully! Once compatibility has been established, there is plenty of information, including precautions, for each manufacturer and router on how to install the firmware. If you have a large house or simply a Wi-Fi blackspot, you can use a second router to cure the problem.

Here's our helpful guide on how to set up a spare wireless router to act as a repeater. Find your router's IP address First you need to find out some details about the router you're currently using, including which channel it is broadcasting on and what security type it is using.

Reset the router to factory settings Having unearthed that old router which you kept when you changed ISPs a few years ago, the first thing you need to do is reset this router to its factory settings. Configure your second router Connect this second router now, with a network cable, to a PC which is not on your network. Copy over the settings Ignore any setup wizards, and go to the Wi-Fi settings page. Give it a fixed IP address Finally you need to make the slave router work alongside the primary router by giving it a fixed IP address which the primary router will recognise and work with.

Enter the username and password. Many routers will use "admin" as the default entry for both the username and password, though you may need to consult the manual for your specific router. After the password is entered, the router will display its initial status page, with links to the various administration settings. Locate the page that allows you to change the IP address of the router.

The address should be changed so that it is not the same as the main router on the network, or any other network devices. If the main router on the network is set to use Disable the router's DHCP server.

This setting should be on the same page as the IP address, but each router is a little different. When the router is operating normally, this server assigns an IP address to every device that is connected to it. Because this router will be used as a repeater only, the IP addresses will now be handled by the main router on the network. Turn off the DNS server, if it is activated. This function will be taken over by the main router, or by the ISP that provides the Internet connection to your location.

Disable any firewall that is built into the router. Usually, this can be done in the "Security" section, and it may require you to alter several settings, depending on the make and model of the router. Remove any entries that are located in the "Port Forwarding" section. On some routers, this may be referred to as "Applications and Gaming," and it allows certain programs to have less-restricted access to the Internet.

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If you're upgrading to a faster, stronger wireless router, don't chuck your older Wi-Fi box. With the magic of DD-WRT, you can turn your older wireless router into a range-expanding Wi-Fi repeater. For example, if your primary router's local IP address is , make your old router's (the repeater's) (or something along those lines). Basically, change that third number to. How to Use a Router as a Repeater Step. Connect your computer to the router using a standard Ethernet cable. Open your Web browser and enter the IP address of your router. Enter the username and password. Many routers will use "admin" as Locate the page that allows you to change the IP address of the router.